The collector john fowles ebook

 

    Read "The Collector" by John Fowles available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Hailed as the first modern psychological . Editorial Reviews. From Library Journal. Fowles launched his career with The Collector, which download a Kindle Kindle eBooks Kindle Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More Kindle Book Deals Free Reading Apps Kindle Singles. Get this from a library! The collector.. [John Fowles] -- A butterfly collector wins a lottery and, thus, acquires a remote cottage where he imprisons a young.

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    The Collector John Fowles Ebook

    eBook Editions . Home; The Collector. The Collector Discover John Fowles' compelling classic first novel 'Short and spare and direct. download the eBook The Collector by John Fowles online from Australia's leading online eBook store. Download eBooks from Booktopia today. Hailed as the first modern psychological thriller, THE COLLECTOR is the internationally bestselling novel that catapulted John Fowles into the front rank of .

    Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! Formatting may be different depending on your device and eBook type. Discover John Fowles' compelling classic first novel 'Short and spare and direct, an intelligent thriller with psychological and social overtones' Sunday Times. Withdrawn, uneducated and unloved, Frederick collects butterflies and takes photographs. He is obsessed with a beautiful stranger, art student Miranda. Coming into unexpected money, he downloads a remote Sussex house and calmly abducts Miranda, believing she will grow to love him in time. Alone and desperate, Miranda must struggle to understand her captor if she is to gain her freedom General Format: English Number Of Pages: Random House. Help Centre.

    This is one of those boy meets girl, chloroforms her, throws her in the back of the van and stuffs her in his basement type stories. Fred is the sweetest psycho ever! The kindest and most attentive!

    No slurping and grunting at all! This is a brilliant stroke by John Fowles and really messes with your mind. As does the whole book. After that things just go badly. View all 11 comments. Aug 09, Dana Ilie rated it it was amazing Shelves: I definitely think Book Readers should have this book on their shelf. View all 19 comments. Impotent sociopath kidnaps beautiful art student. Told partly from the sociopath's perspective. That's my jam!

    I should have loved this book! But something left me cold. I suppose it may have been all the bitching and complaining the beautiful art student did in her stupid diary. What a helpless twit! Not to imply that I'd be brave and cunning or anything In fact, I'm pretty sure I'd be a helpless twit as well.

    But I'll be goddamned if I'd expect anyone to enjoy readi Impotent sociopath kidnaps beautiful art student.

    But I'll be goddamned if I'd expect anyone to enjoy reading the daily chronicles of what a helpless twit I'd been.

    The ending really made me smile, though. The creepy ending made it all worthwhile. Crazy fucker. View all 29 comments. Jan 25, Fabian rated it really liked it. This novel is over fifty years old!

    Though its semi predictable, the end is nonetheless terribly terrific. That there are two strands of narrative is sometimes a revelation, sometimes an encumbrance like living through a terrible ordeal not once but twice! Both psycholo This novel is over fifty years old! View 2 comments. Oct 19, Bonnie rated it it was amazing Recommended to Bonnie by: Beverly J.

    He wants me living-but-dead. He makes preparations by downloading a house out in the country, downloading assorted objects and things he knows she will need, convinced that if he can only capture her and keep her that she will slowly grow to love him.

    The first part of the novel was told from Frederick's point of view and it was rather alarming at his thought process. In his mind, there is nothing morally wrong with what he intends to do and what he actually ends up doing. She writes about G. To Miranda, G. At first I had a hard time determining the relevancy of these recollections, but it essentially just became another disturbing piece of the story to see how influential G.

    Always sneering at him, jabbing him, hating him and showing it. But linked destiny. Like being shipwrecked on an island—a raft—together. In every way not wanting to be together. But together. Suffice it to say, it gave me goosebumps. It was not the ending I had anticipated, but I still felt that the author was successful in creating the everlasting effect I believe he intended.

    View all 46 comments. May 30, Michael rated it it was amazing Shelves: One of the first dark psychological thrillers--at least in modern times though depending on how you categorize them, James or Poe or even some of the ancient Greeks might usefully be described this way, too.

    A tale of obsession and art and butterflies--need I say more? Wonderful for those who take their fiction black. What's especially interesting here is the sheer banality of Frederick's evil. He kidnaps Miranda, then doesn't really know what to do or how to relate to her as an actual person One of the first dark psychological thrillers--at least in modern times though depending on how you categorize them, James or Poe or even some of the ancient Greeks might usefully be described this way, too.

    He kidnaps Miranda, then doesn't really know what to do or how to relate to her as an actual person instead of as an object. View all 8 comments. Jul 04, J. Other reviewers have said what I would say about The Collector. It's haunting, disturbing, and impossible to forget once you've finished. While not a typical "horror" story, it is one that probably occurs more often in the real world than not, and the person s involved could be a distant relative, a sibling, a son or a daughter.

    Allow me to state right now that it's not an easy read. As someone who derives enjoyment from books of this nature, I was determined to remain objective from the onset. I wanted Frederick to earn my disdain, just as I wanted Miranda to garner my sympathy and support.

    Little did I know just how masterfully John Fowles would pen the book. Written in four sections, you are given Frederick's POV, then Miranda's via her diary , and finally two final portions of which the last seems like an epilogue. The format doesn't seem to be all that special, but in truth, it is what makes The Collector so powerful -- your emotions, quite literally, are used against you.

    Frederick is a gentle -- yet, due to his fears and compulsions, dangerous -- man. In the beginning, you want to understand his desire to earn Miranda's "love. Even more tragic is that as much as you dislike Miranda I'm ashamed to confess this, but almost the entire portion written from Frederik's POV I didn't care for her when it's her turn to speak, you are presented an entirely different picture -- of a girl with hopes, dreams, and the realization that the choices that were of such importance in her life -- namely her inability to choose to reveal her love for another man, as well as her faith in God -- are made all the more heartbreaking in light of the predicament in which she finds herself.

    Of course, when you delve into the third and fourth parts, it's just devastating. It's disturbing in a multitude of ways, but it's the ending that drives the final nail in the coffin no pun intended. Suffice it to say, those last few words gave me chills and even now I can't stop thinking about them. Dec 21, Evan rated it liked it Shelves: A great pal of mine, who shall remain nameless, is a collector.

    Truly and obsessively one. His house is filled from floor to ceiling with records and CDs and other bric a brac. It's a very large, sprawling ranch with a half floor up as well as a basement. It should be a spacious and roomy abode, but when you walk in there it's like squeezing through the Fat Man's misery section of Mammoth Cave - you have to turn sideways to get through. He shares this space with a half dozen cats.

    It's filthy. R A great pal of mine, who shall remain nameless, is a collector. Reading this, I wondered too if he might have a lady squirreled away in the basement, but dismissed this notion.

    There is simply no room down there to do any such thing, every inch is piled with stuff. He compares himself to the Collyer brothers see Wikipedia , whose obsession with collecting proved fatal. And so it is in Fowles' "The Collector," but how that is so constitutes a spoiler. There were no spoilers in it for me, as I'd seen the William Wyler film for the first time in the early '70s on TV, and I think what caught my eye and kept my interest then was lovely Samantha Eggar, as Miranda, a role in which she was well cast.

    I think she captured the character of the book. I've since seen the movie again and it holds up, though reading the book I think that Terence Stamp may have been too glamorous looking to play the role of "The Collector. Hers approach to the telling of it, which is not the strategy of the film, that simply incorporates both these into a straightforward narrative.

    So yeah, I'm reading it and the story seems to end halfway through and I begin Miranda's diary and I begin to think, goddamn, I have to read this story all over again?!

    Son of a bitch. But it's a very clever trope and in many ways Miranda doesn't make a very good case for herself in her diary account. She's young and arrogant just the kind of snob that the collector ascertains.

    None of this justifies what he does to her, of course, and that's one of the strengths of the book, toying at the readers' sympathies for both characters.

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    They're both unlikeable, and yet one feels for both of them. The collector has a complex repressive psychology - he knows what he wants, but doesn't. And she is highly impressionable, as her accounts of longing for her insufferable mentor, the Picasso-like womanizing artist, G. The battle of wits here is good, and is well handled in the movie as well. I had hoped that Fowles would not have stated so obviously through Miranda's voice that the collector was someone who treated her the same way as the butterflies in his collection, in such an aloof way, under glass, suffocating and snuffing out what he supposedly loved.

    This is easy enough to glean without the author's help. And this is the way I feel about my friend, the record collector - he has tens of thousands of LPs, but cannot play them, won't listen to them. How can one ever choose from such a collection?

    Merely the having of them sates him, for the moment, for he is never sated. What does he want out of it? He doesn't know. He has the object, but can't ever fully appreciate the true essence of what's inside it - the music.

    And so it is with the collector, whose idealized view of Miranda trumps the reality of who she is. So, yes, this is a great story, well and cleverly told in plain language, often with thoughtful insights.

    And yet, somehow, I never felt like I was in the presence of great literature - even though I felt I was in the presence of a writer capable of it.

    Perhaps the dispassionate tone of the collector's account made me feel this and yet Graham Greene is largely dispassionate and I feel great passion in his work. Fowles' partisans suggest that "The Magus" is his great contribution to literature, so someday hopefully I can check that out. Anyway I'm still absorbing what I've read, so all the aspects of the book I'd like to comment on will likely be unstated.

    I tend to move on.. View all 6 comments. Oh boy what did I just read?!

    This was most definitely a strange sinister and creepy story. Beyond the obvious depraved strangeness of the whole scenario he had no backbone! Nothing going for him. Strange strange. Obsession, power and a beautiful captured butterfly in the form of Miranda and you get a wicked little story with plenty of arty metaphors to chew on.

    I almost loved this book but not every second of it. The story flagged for me once the perspective shifted to Miranda. Feb 22, F rated it really liked it Shelves: Loved - so creepy! Thought by some to be the first psychological thriller, this book left me slightly wanting. The Collector is broken into three parts. The first part is from Clegg's point of view. Clegg is a man obsessed with a young woman and decides to "collect" her, much as he collects butterflies. The second part is from the woman's point of view, once she's been "collected".

    The Collector by John Fowles - Penguin Books Australia

    This was the part that I found unsatisfying. There were some observations in this portion about class, money and society wh 3. There were some observations in this portion about class, money and society which probably were more pertinent in the 60's, which is when this book was written , than they are now.

    I found this portion slowed down the pacing considerably. The third part goes back to Clegg's point of view. Clegg is where this book lives. The peeks inside his mind, while presented as normal thoughts on his part, are truly chilling to us readers who are sane.

    I shivered to read some of the things he was thinking. These psychological tics and the detached way in which they were presented were what made this book great. You can see how I'm torn here between being unsatisfied, while at the same time finding some portions of The Collector to be outstanding. To today's jaded horror readers? This might not be the book for you.

    But to fans of stories like Silence of the Lambs, or even Red Dragon, I think this book will appeal, even though some of the themes are a bit outdated. It's to them that I recommend The Collector. View all 9 comments.

    It's hard to believe that after so many novels and films about sociopathic kidnappers, I would still be shocked by a book written in the early 60s. The Collector is a traumatizing novel about a guy who kidnaps a young woman, although Clegg is not your typical kidnapper and Miranda is by no means your typical kidnapee. What really makes it exceptional is the uniqueness of the two characters and how this shows through the alternating narratives.

    It soon becomes clear that neither of them is totall It's hard to believe that after so many novels and films about sociopathic kidnappers, I would still be shocked by a book written in the early 60s. Choose your country's store to see books available for download.

    Hailed as the first modern psychological thriller, The Collector is the internationally bestselling novel that catapulted John Fowles into the front rank of contemporary novelists.

    This tale of obsessive love--the story of a lonely clerk who collects butterflies and of the beautiful young art student who is his ultimate quarry--remains unparalleled in its power to startle and mesmerize. Red Clocks. Leni Zumas. Jack Ketchum. The Hunger. Alma Katsu. The White Album.

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    The Collector

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    The Collector by John Fowles Hailed as the first modern psychological thriller, The Collector is the internationally bestselling novel that catapulted John Fowles into the front rank of contemporary novelists. This tale of obsessive love--the story of a lonely clerk who collects butterflies and of the beautiful young art student who is his ultimate quarry--remains unparalleled in its power to startle and mesmerize.

    The Flight From The Enchanter by Iris Murdoch Annette runs away from her finishing school but learns more than she bargained for in the real world beyond; the fierce and melacholy Rosa is torn between two Polish brothers; Peter is obsessed by an indecipherable ancient script. This is a story of a group of people under a spell, and the centre of it all is the mysterious Mischa Fox, the enchanter.