Gary jennings aztec epub

 

    Gary Jennings's Aztec is the extraordinary story of the last and greatest native civilization of North America. Told in the words of one of the most robust and. Gary Jennings was known for the rigorous and intensive research behind his Aztec Fire. Aztec (Series). Book 5. Gary Jennings Author Robert Gleason Author. Gary Jennings - [Aztec 02] - Aztec Autumn (retail) (epub) - dokument [*.epub] Praise for Aztec Autumn 'Fascinating.,,, Guided by exhaustive research into.

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    Gary Jennings Aztec Epub

    Aztec Rage (Aztec). byGary Jennings; Robert Gleason; Junius Podrug. Publication date Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files. Gary Jennings' Aztec fire the colony's finest gunmaker and hides the truth about his native Aztec heritage Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files . Read "Aztec" by Gary Jennings available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Gary Jennings's Aztec is the extraordinary story of.

    These sprawling works, sometimes reaching , words, are packed with violence, braggadocio and vivid sex scenes. Gary Jennings usually structures his historical novels around a narrator who comes of age in the vicissitudes of the story and then takes his or her life lessons into an adulthood fraught with danger and sexual escapade. Carefully researched and possessing a wealth of period detail, Gary Jennings's novels have earned him praise as "a historical novelist of the first order," according to Christian H. Moe in Twentieth-Century Historical Writers. Copywriter and account executive for advertising agencies, New York City, ; newspaper reporter in California and Virginia, Military: U. This historical novel represents a triumph of research over art. Gary Jennings unfolds the story of the overthrow of the Native Mexicans through the voice of an amiable but wry Aztec adventurer named Mixtli.

    Nevertheless, I was precociously inquisitive and very sharp of ear. Also, my mother Cuicani and I did reside in the Aztlan palace with my Uncle Mixtzin and his son Yeyac and daughter Ameyatl, so I was always able to hear whatever news arrived and whatever comment it provoked among my uncle's Speaking Council.

    As is indicated by the -tzin suffixion to my uncle's name, he was a noble, the highest noble among us Azteca, being the Uey-Tecutli-the Revered Governor-of Aztlan. Some while earlier, when I was just a toddling babe, the late Uey-Tlatoani Motecuzoma, Revered Speaker of the Mexica, the most powerful nation in all The One World, had accorded our then-small village the status of "autonomous colony of the Mexica.

    So, although we were exceedingly far distant from the capital city of Tenochtitlan-The Heart of The One World-Motecuzoma's swiftmessengers routinely brought to our Aztlan palace, as to other colonies, any news deemed of interest to his undergovernors. Of course, the news of those intruders from beyond the sea was anything but routine.

    It caused no small consternation and speculation among Aztlan's Speaking Council. But Canautli overrode him, as I could have told the priest he would, because I well knew how my great-grandfather loved to talk. His people might never have known of it, but he confessed to it. In a fit of intoxication-after overindulgence in the drunk-making octli beverage-he committed the act of ahuilnema with his own sister.

    Or, some say, with his own daughter.

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    The Tolteca so much adored the Feathered Serpent that they doubtless would have forgiven him that misconduct, but he could not forgive himself. Canautli went on: His subjects prostrated themselves on the beach, loudly bewailing his departure. So he called to them, assuring them that someday, when he had done sufficient penance in exile, he would return.

    But, over the years, the Tolteca themselves gradually vanished into extinction. And Quetzalcoatl has never been seen again. He was almost never of very warm or cheerful temperament, and the messenger's news had not been of a sort to exhilarate him. It would be next to impossible to make a raft float off across the sea. To get it out past the breakers and the combers and the landward surge of the surf. But it appears that he returns with a numerous crew. Or passengers.

    Wherever he went, he could have married wife after wife, and begotten whole nations of progeny. All the histories agree-never before or since his time has The One World enjoyed such peace and happiness and good fortune.

    We shall be abased, made lower than the lowest slaves. Deposed ,,, dismissed ,,, discarded to beg and starve. During the next year and a half or so, hardly a month went by without a swift-messenger from Tenochtitlan bringing ever more astounding and disconcerting news. From one runner, we would learn that the strangers were only men, not gods or the progeny of gods, and that they called themselves espanoles or castellanos. The two names seemed interchangeable, but the latter was easier for us to transmute into Nahuatl, so for a long time all of us referred to the outlanders as the Caxtilteca.

    Then the next-arriving runner would inform us that the Caxtilteca resembled gods-at least, war gods-in that they were rapacious, ferocious, merciless, and lustful of conquest, because they were now forcing their way inland from the Eastern Sea.

    Then the next swift-messenger would report that the Caxtilteca certainly displayed godlike, or at least magical, attributes in their methods and weapons of war, for many of them rode mounted on giant, antlerless buck deer, and many of them wielded fearsome tubes that discharged lightning and thunder, and others had arrows and spears tipped with a metal that never bent or broke, and all wore armor of that same metal, which was impenetrable by ordinary projectiles. Then came a messenger wearing the white mantle of mourning, and with his hair braided in the manner signifying bad news.

    His report was that the invaders had defeated one nation and tribe after another, on their way westward-the Totonaca, the Tepeyahuaca, the Texcaltaca-then had impressed any surviving native warriors into their own ranks. It was said that they had come from across the Eastern Sea in huge houses that floated on the water and were propelled by immense birdlike wings. I was only six years old at that time, with a whole seven years to wait before I could don, beneath my mantle, the maxtlatl loincloth that signifies the attainment of manhood.

    Hence I was an insignificant person, of no consequence at all. Nevertheless, I was precociously inquisitive and very sharp of ear. Also, my mother Cuicani and I did reside in the Aztlan palace with my Uncle Mixtzin and his son Yeyac and daughter Ameyatl, so I was always able to hear whatever news arrived and whatever comment it provoked among my uncle's Speaking Council.

    As is indicated by the -tzin suffixion to my uncle's name, he was a noble, the highest noble among us Azteca, being the Uey-Tecutli-the Revered Governor-of Aztlan.

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    Some while earlier, when I was just a toddling babe, the late Uey-Tlatoani Motecuzoma, Revered Speaker of the Mexica, the most powerful nation in all The One World, had accorded our then-small village the status of "autonomous colony of the Mexica. So, although we were exceedingly far distant from the capital city of Tenochtitlan-The Heart of The One World-Motecuzoma's swiftmessengers routinely brought to our Aztlan palace, as to other colonies, any news deemed of interest to his undergovernors.

    Of course, the news of those intruders from beyond the sea was anything but routine. It caused no small consternation and speculation among Aztlan's Speaking Council. But Canautli overrode him, as I could have told the priest he would, because I well knew how my great-grandfather loved to talk. His people might never have known of it, but he confessed to it. In a fit of intoxication-after overindulgence in the drunk-making octli beverage-he committed the act of ahuilnema with his own sister.

    Or, some say, with his own daughter. The Tolteca so much adored the Feathered Serpent that they doubtless would have forgiven him that misconduct, but he could not forgive himself.

    Canautli went on: "That is why he built a raft on the seashore-some say it was made of feathers felted together, some say it was made of interlaced snakes-and he floated off across the Eastern Sea. His subjects prostrated themselves on the beach, loudly bewailing his departure. So he called to them, assuring them that someday, when he had done sufficient penance in exile, he would return.

    But, over the years, the Tolteca themselves gradually vanished into extinction. And Quetzalcoatl has never been seen again. He was almost never of very warm or cheerful temperament, and the messenger's news had not been of a sort to exhilarate him.

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